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Pandemic bride woes

Republika

CHINA CONSTRUCTS | Louise Nichole Logarta

From Thursday to Saturday in the third week of this month, Baguio Country Club, in collaboration with the Baguio Wedding and Events Suppliers Organization and the Manila and Pangasinan Wedding and Event Suppliers, is hosting a bridal fair.


I have been a bride-to-be for approximately six months now and one thing has become abundantly clear to me in the course of those months: anybody who ever said that wedding planning is fun, is lying. But to be fair, it’s probably because the pandemic was something out of left field.


As a person who makes lists and feels a semblance of order when my tasks are outlined, I get more than a little frazzled when there are last-minute changes or something doesn’t go the way I thought it would. From what I gather, planning a wedding is no easy feat—and it only gets harder when you’re planning a wedding in the middle of a global pandemic. And not just any wedding—a destination wedding.


The face of the wedding industry has changed ever since the pandemic hit. Whereas pre-pandemic weddings tended to have hundreds of guests, today, mini- and micro-weddings have become the style. Mostly it’s because events venues have imposed limitations on the number of allowed guests in order to adhere to social distancing protocols. As the pandemic spread, borders within and between countries have closed and opened turn and turn about.


For anybody not familiar with the term, a bridal fair is an event where various suppliers and vendors feature their offerings. You’ll find anything from cakes, wedding gowns and hair and makeup artists to photographers, videographers and event stylists. And those are just a few. Engaged couples often attend bridal fairs to make the most out of suppliers’ discounted rates and be able to talk to them directly.


This is an integral part of planning a wedding outside your area of residence. The biggest threat, under the current circumstances, is the government’s push-and-pull nature when it comes to policies for domestic travel.


I am part of a weddings support group on Facebook and the sheer size of concerns of brides-to-be is enough to get the cogs in my brain turning about my own wedding. Some have had to push back the original date of their weddings, primarily because of the constantly changing pandemic protocols the government imposes.


Lately, government officials and Covid19 task forces have released contradictory policies and it’s highly confusing and irritating. As vaccinations continue, they had previously said that only inoculation cards are necessary to enter a certain locale. But more recently, the Department of Health said otherwise. Covid19 testing is not necessary UNLESS the local government requires it.


One can only hope that they get their act together and finalize decisions. Weddings take a toll on not only the engaged parties’ mental health—but their bank accounts as well. Not to mention, it is also a huge inconvenience to guests as they have to take leaves from their busy schedules and plan ahead to attend. It’s not easy, when our government plays tug-of-war with travel policies.


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